Resources for preprints in the public eye

Today, as described in Project Coordinator Jigisha’s Patel opinion piece in The Scientist, we’re pleased to share a series of resources and guidelines emerging from our work on the representation of preprints to broad audiences. These infographics summarize more detailed documents drafted by working groups who considered how to preprint servers, researchers, institutions, and journalists…

Preprint Sprint Kickoff group photo

Kicking off the #PreprintSprint

On Friday, 2020-11-13, 100 participants gathered at the #PreprintSprint Kickoff to workshop 21 ideas for encouraging more feedback on preprints. While the bulk of the event was spent in breakout sessions, the introductory lightning talks can be found below. Slides can be found here. Project leads are currently integrating ideas and feedback received at the…

Call for proposals to encourage preprint curation and peer review

Community feedback on preprints makes rapid science more robust. Review and commentary can help authors improve their articles; curation can provide readers with helpful context and enhance discoverability. But despite the benefits, barriers to reviewing and curating preprints remain. Potential reviewers and curators see few incentives to organize and comment on preprints, and reviews can…

Preprint abstracts should be open: why we joined the I4OA stakeholder group

We’ve proud to join the stakeholder group of the Initiative for Open Abstracts, a sister project to Initiative for Open Citations. Making abstracts openly available and machine-readable helps readers discover relevant research. For more on why this is important, see this explainer.  Open abstracts are important for preprints as well as published journal articles. The…

Preprints in the Public Eye

Today, we’re pleased to announce the launch of a project on the use of preprints in the media with support from the Open Society Foundations.  Premature media coverage was the top concern about preprints in our recent #biopreprints2020 survey, for both those who had published their research as preprints and for those who had not.…

The economic argument for preprints

Preprinting helps researchers and the scientific enterprise as a whole by providing increased visibility and access to early results and facilitating feedback that improves papers. While the benefits can be felt on an individual level by readers and authors, the advantages compound at the systemic level to increase the pace and efficiency of discovery.  The…

Systematize information on journal policies and practices – A call to action

By Willem Halffman, Serge Horbach, Jessica Polka, Tony Ross-Hellauer, and Ludo Waltman Crossposted from Leiden Madtrics Recently the creators of Transpose and the Platform for Responsible Editorial Policies convened an online workshop on infrastructures that provide information on scholarly journals. In this blog post they look back at the workshop and discuss next steps. In…

Newsletter vol 27: Join the #PreprintReviewChallenge, Review Commons webinar, and more

Join the #PreprintReviewChallenge: Help us create the largest collection of preprint reviews in a day On September 22, ASAPbio will be hosting an online live preprint review event as part of Peer Review Week 2020. We will get together to write constructive comments and reviews on preprints, with the aim to develop the largest collection to date of…

Newsletter vol 26: Benefits and concerns about preprints, August Community Call, #biopreprints2020 report and more

Perceived benefits and concerns about preprints – initial survey results  We had 546 responses to our survey about the perceived benefits and concerns around preprint – our thanks to everyone who shared their views. We will be taking a deeper dive into the data over the coming weeks but here are some initial takes from the responses: Main perceived…