If you know of additional university policies on the use of preprints in hiring and promotion, please contact us.

More instances of open science in hiring & promotion more generally can be found in OSF projects by David Mellor and Felix Schönbrodt.

Hiring

UCSF (USA)

This ad for a faculty position in the  Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences department at the University of California, San Francisco notes, where the CV is mentioned, that “we encourage listing of publications on preprint servers with a DOI.”

 

UT Austin (USA)

This ad for a 2017 tenure-track faculty search asks applicants to send in “up to 5 reprints/preprints.”

The Rockefeller University (USA)

In a 2016 fall faculty candidate advertisement, candidates were prompted to submit “Relevant Publications or Submitted Manuscripts/Pre-prints”

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rockefeller-ad

via Stephen Floor

The trend continues in 2018.

via Leslie Vosshall

University of California, Santa Cruz (USA)

The ad for a 2016 opening in the Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental biology department called for “a list of published manuscripts and pre-prints (no “in preparation”)”

ucsc-job-ad

via Needhi Bhalla

Tenure and promotion

UFRGS (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)

A 2020-01-09 statement from the Dean of UFRGS Research encourages the use of preprints and their inclusion in projects, work plans, and activity reports.

UC Davis (USA)

A “preprints” category in the online faculty achievements database was announced in an email to faculty.

NYU School of Medicine (USA)

Under “Tenure Eligible Track:” Candidate should submit “5-7 recent representative papers, preprints or articles in press”

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nyu-screengrab

Journal license negotiation

University of California Academic Senate University Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication (USA)

On April 13, 2018, The University of California Academic Senate University Committee on Library and Scholarly Communication (UCOLASC) endorsed 18 principles that should be taken into account when the University of California negotiates with publishers for journal licenses. Number two is:

No restrictions on preprints. Our authors shall have the right to submit for publication work they have previously made available as preprints.”

via Stuart Taylor